Robert Eric Brady
37, of Webster Springs



Sandra Lynn Brooks
50, of Summersville



Clara “Maxine” Brown
83, of Summersville



Helen Grace Buss
94, of Summersville



Briar Lee Cogar



Kimberly Sue Covert
57, of Summersville



Zelma Elizabeth Dodrill
90, of St. Albans



Edwin M. Dorsey
82, of Palmyra, Ohio



Charles Wilson Ellison
61



Carolyn Jean “Potsie” Fisher
55, of Webster Springs



Elvia Lucille Green
89, of Richwood



Ida Eva McCourt Green
103, of Webster Springs



James Lowell Hypes
90, of Fayette County



Junior Frank Justice
82, of Richwood



William Joseph “Joe” McCutcheon
47, of Summersville



Janice E. Miller
69, of Marengo, Ohio



Kenneth Allen Naylor
49, of Summersville



Carleton Patrick Neal Jr.
39, of Ravenswood



Sherron Etta Nichols
69, of Summersville



Mrs. Leah Margaret Radcliff
65, of Monroe, N.C.



Wilma Richardson
94, of Enon



Janis Hope Vannatter Toney
of Richwood



Anthony Dee Trivolette
31, of Huntington



Alma Jean Varner
53, of Summersville



Evelyn Jarvis Nettles Williams 93, of Sutton



Martha Cogar Williams
73, of Richwood




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County Superintendent recommends School Consolidation

Citing the continued countywide loss of student enrollment, low student participation and too few program offerings in career and technical education and inequities in some curriculum areas between the two high schools, Nicholas County Superintendent of Schools Dr. Donna Burge-Tetrick recommended to the Nicholas County Board of Education on Monday evening, Jan. 9, that the county’s two middle and two high schools be closed, along with the career and technical center and consolidated into two new schools.

The Board also rescinded two motions from their Jan. 3 meeting, conducted a student expulsion nearing and extended a contract with a property owner at one of the emergency school locations.

Present for the meeting were Board President Dr. Gus Penix, Vice-President Fred Amick and members Darrell White, Phil Berry and A.J. Rogers.

Public input
Jon Estep of Richwood, a regional representative of the West Virginia Federation Teachers, addressed the Board on a couple of issues.

Estep acknowledged to the Board that he had mistakenly stated at a previous meeting that the Board could hire a FEMA consultant at no cost to the Board.

Superintendent of Schools Dr. Donna Burge-Tetrick explained at the Jan. 3 meeting that the state School Building Authority would be the applicant for a consultant.

On another matter regarding the re-building of flood-damaged schools, Estep said, “I am also a staunch supporter of leaving the schools where they are because they work for kids.”

 

 

 

It’s a New Year, Baby!

Little Miss Maddox Makenlie McCoy had the honor of being the first baby born at Summersville Regional Medical Center in 2017. Maddox was born at 12:46 p.m. on January 1 to Airman Jacob McCoy and Kenzie McCoy. Her grandparents are Jennifer Holcomb of Cowen and the late Bubba Blankenship of Rupert. Her step-grandparent is Tim Holcomb of Cowen. Great-grandparents are Betty Thompson Messineo and the late James (Bimbo) Thompson of Mt. Nebo, step-grandfather Joe Messineo of Mt. Nebo, and Brenda and Steve Goins of Smoot. Maddox’s father is stationed at Sheppard Air Force base in Wichita, Texas, and was able to fly home for the birth. He returned to duty a few days later.

 

 

 

 

Altizer re-elected Commission President

The Nicholas County Commission re-elected Commissioner Ken Altizer as President for 2017 at their meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 3.

The Commission also received a financial update, heard an update on a stream cleanup project resulting from the June flood, set the holidays for 2017, set the dates to sit as the Board of Equalization and Review, heard a request from the prosecuting attorney, set the budget deadline for the 2017-18 fiscal year and changed the day of their meetings.

Present for the first meeting of 2017 were Commissioner Ken Altizer, Commissioner Lyle Neal and newly-elected Commissioner Dr. Lloyd Adkins.

Election of President
The first item of business for the new year was the election of  Commission President for 2017.

Commissioner Neal nominated Commissioner Altizer to serve as Commission President for 2017. There were no other nominations for president.

Commissioner Altizer was re-elected Commission President by a 2-0 vote with Commissioner Neal and Commissioner Adkins voting for the motion. Commissioner Altizer abstained from the vote.

Commissioner Altizer, a Democrat from Mount Nebo, will be serving his third year as Commission President. He is in the fifth year of his first term on the Commission representing Gauley District.

 

 

 

Johnson named to Supreme Court post;

Callaghan hearing continued to Jan. 24

By Pat Hanna
The Nicholas Chronicle

Former Nicholas County Circuit Judge Gary Johnson has been named interim administrative director of the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals.

Johnson’s appointment was announced by the high court on Jan. 4, four days after his 24-year career as Nicholas County judge ended.

He replaces Steve Canterbury, who reportedy was fired in a 3-2 vote of the high court’s justices after more than 11 years on the job.

Meantime, the Supreme Court was scheduled to hear arguments on Jan. 10 on a recommendation by the state Judicial Hearing Board to suspend Johnson’s successor, Steve Callaghan, over a controversial flier he mailed to voters in the final days of last May’s judicial campaign.

However, the hearing was continued after Chief Justice Allen Loughry, Justice Margaret Workman, Justice Menis Ketchum and Justice Beth Walker, responding to a motion filed Jan. 9 by Callaghan’s attorney, Lonnie Simmons, voluntarily disqualified themselves from the case.

In a memorandum, the four justices said that after reviewing Simmons’ motion, “it appears there are no demonstrable disqualifying factors necessitating recusal from the matter. However, out of an abundance of caution and in accordance with Canon 2, Rule 2.11 (a) of the Code of Judicial Conduct, the remaining members of the court recuse ourselves from this matter.”

Justice Robin Davis recused herself shortly after Johnson was named to the post and was replaced by Senior Status Justice Thomas McHugh. According to reports, Davis joined Ketchum in voting not to fire Canterbury and then abstained from voting on Johnson’s appointment before recusing herself from the Callaghan case.

 

 

 

Richwood OKs payment of more flood-related bills

By Pat Hanna
The Nicholas Chronicle

Richwood officials have voted to pay more than $447,500 in flood-related bills from the latest infusion of funds from the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Richwood Common Council and Council’s Finance Committee took the action during meetings held last Thursday evening, Jan. 5.

Officials agreed to pay off the remaining $218,057.36 owed to major contractors involved in debris removal, along with $144,055.49 in outstanding incident command payroll.

They also voted to pay Mendon Pipeline $75,000 for repair work on sewer lines and on water lines that cross the Cherry River, leaving about $490,000 still to be paid.

Officials also agreed to spend $10,519.74 for new water meters. That money had already been received by the city.

After paying those bills, officials were told, about $221,000 will be left in the FEMA account with outstanding flood-related bills of around $1.1 million.

Meanwhile, a report compiled for the city by Simmons Recovery Consulting estimated total public flood damage at more than $10.5 million, including more than $8 million in damage to the city’s water and sewer systems.

The report said the damage equates to a per capita impact of $4,875 for each of Richwood’s 2,051 residents, not including damages to private property, local businesses or schools.

To put that in perspective, the report said, the amounts FEMA uses as indicators that disaster damage warrants federal assistance are approximately $1.25 per capita statewide and $3.50 per capita at the county level.

Thus, according to the report, the damage sustained by the city can be categorized as significant or even catastrophic.

 

 

 

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